Friday, August 19, 2005

This Nano Whiz Is Thinking Big

American-trained scientists like Han Jie are playing an important role in Beijing's efforts to boost China's accomplishments in both science and technology. Han, a 48-year-old nanotech expert who has worked at NASA and at IBM (IBM ) in the U.S., returned to his native China last year and is now the director of the new National Engineering Research Center for Nanotechnology in Shanghai. A key part of China's effort to build a nanotech base that can be on the cutting edge of an emerging industry, the center is focusing on practical applications rather than pure research in nanoelectronics and nanobiotechnology. "The R&D that I'm doing is radically different from what I did in the U.S. because we have different market needs," Han explains. "Most people simply follow the direction of what the U.S. is doing. That cannot put China in the lead position. We have to do something unique for China's needs. I don't think that China should follow the American way.""In my center," Han adds, "we are more focused on energy saving because energy is a big problem in China." His center is working on a collaboration with a state-run oil field in northeastern Shandong province to make smoke-free diesel from heavy oil, a substance that otherwise is hard to turn into useful fuel.

2 Comments:

At August 19, 2005 8:24 AM, Blogger ThBadMonkey said...

Yup, China is gonna get the prize...as we are going Third World. I guess thats whats meant by 'free trade", We are freely trading Third World status with china...

 
At August 19, 2005 8:53 AM, Blogger ik said...

Also look at this

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/biz/archives/2004/11/08/2003210211

"Pioneer's move to China will have major impact
TECHNOLOGICAL SHIFT: A search for financing led computer designer Steve Chen to China, a step that could provide a huge boost to Beijing's push to build supercomputers "

Chen, a Taiwanese-born US citizen who was considered one of the nation's most brilliant supercomputer designers while working in this country for the technology pioneer Seymour Cray in the 1980s, has moved to China, where he is leading an effort to claim the world computing speed record.

 

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